Most learn about martial arts through movies and print publications, primarily fictional. “Fiction is drama, the blood of drama is conflict, and martial arts are rooted in conflict,” writes James Grady in chapter one. Good fiction uses martial arts well, while poor writing skills can be plain boring!
This anthology is a collection of fifteen articles that cover the richness and depth of Asian martial arts in both movies and literature.

Asian Martial Arts in Literature & Movies

$21.95Price
    • Fist of Fantasy: Martial Arts and Prose Fiction, by James Grady, B.A.
    • Celluloid Katas: Martial Arts in the Movies — A Practitioner’s Prejudices, by James Grady, B.A.
    • A Sort of Swordsman, by John J. Donohue, Ph.D.
    • Wang Wu Notices the Commotion on Music Hall Street: An Excerpt from Tales of Chivalrous and Altruistic Heros, by Christopher Bates, M.A.
    • Inside Interview with Curtis Wong: Extraordinary Contributions to Martial Arts Popularization, by Michael Maliszewski, Ph.D.
    • Don Wilson: Kickboxing Champion and Film Star Shares His Perspectives, by Michael Maliszewski, Ph.D.
    • Dianxue: A Genre-Specific Form of Attack in Martial Arts Fiction, by Olivia Mok, Ph.D.
    • Film Producer Andre Morgan and the Evolution of Asian Martial Arts in Movies, by Michael Maliszewski, Ph.D. 
    • Heiho: A Tale of Strategy, by John J. Donohue, Ph.D.
    • The Master: Chinese Boxing Accounts in an Envelope, by John F. Gilbey, M.A.
    • Again! Practicing for Perfection, by John Richard DeRose
    • Samurai Geometry: A Story of Values, by Peter Graebner, M.A.
    • From the Tatami Mat to the Printed Page: Author Barry Eisler Keeps His Fiction Real, by Brian R. Sheridan, M.A.
    • Arthur Rosenfeld: Martial Artist and Storyteller, by Thomas H. Bailey, Jr., L.M.P., A.P.
    • Fighting Heroes: The Core Values of the Xia Tradition in Early China, by Albert Dalia, Ph.D.
  • 6" x 9" paperback, 209 pages, 113 illustrations. eBOOK AVAILABLE from Kindle, iTunes, Nook, and Kobo.