The combative forms of movement meet all the criteria required to be called “arts”. Additionally, items associated with martial art theory and practice can be shown in a variety media and appreciated as objets d’art in their own right. This anthology assists anyone interested in discovering the artistic representations of martial traditions. In doing so, we hope that readers who appreciate the contents of this book will be inspired to discover and appreciate the artifacts associated with the martial side of the world’s cultural heritage.

 

Martial Arts in the Arts

$15.95Price
    • Glimpsing Martial Traditions in the Cleveland Museum of Art, by Michael A. DeMarco, M.A.
    • The Material Culture of the Martial Arts: Exhibit Hall of Okinawan Karate, by Anne Manyak, M.A. and Jim Silvan, B.A.
    • Glimpsing Martial Traditions in the Johnson-Humrickhouse Museum, by Michael A. DeMarco, M.A.
    • Art and the Martial Artist, by Joel Stein, M.S.

    • Martial Themes on Kang Xi Porcelains in the Taft Museum, by Michael A. DeMarco, M.A.

    • Ukiyo-e: Sumo as Martial Art, by Joseph Svinth, M.A.

    • Chinese Sword & Brush Masters of the Tang Dynasty (618-906), by Richard A. Pegg, Ph.D.

    • The Way of Brush and Sword: An Interview with Artist Jia Lu, by Michael A. DeMarco, M.A.

    • The Magnificent Beauty of Edged Weapons Made with Persian Watered Steel, by Manouchehr Moshtagh Khorasani, Diplom-Anglist

    • Asian Martial Art Exhibitions at the Swiss Castle of Morges, by Nicolae Gothard Bialokur; translated by Ilinca Vlad

    • Kendo and Shodo in Life: A Long-Lasting Association Between the Way of the Sword and the Brush, by Suien Wada

    • Sorting Out Categories of Bladed Weaponry Using the “Persian Revival Sword” as an Example, by Ruel A. Macaraeg, M.A.

    • Ancient Chinese Bronze Swords in the MacLean Collection, by Richard A. Pegg, Ph.D.

    • Oshigata: Appreciating Japanese Sword Tracings for Their Reference and Beauty, by Anthony DiCristofano

  • 6x9 paperback, 154 pages, 235 illustrations